Kelly R. Rasmussen

Leadership Reality Adventure
Learn to Lead YOUR way

Kelly has been with the 911 industry since 1986. She rose through the ranks from Dispatcher to Director to Dr. (PhD- Public Safety Leadership).

In 2006, Kelly co-founded Success Communications training company and has trained all over the U.S. and Canada. Success has been highlighted on CNN, MSNBC, Fox news, and other news channels.

She is the author of, CALL911! True Stories from My Life in Emergency Dispatch, published by Select Books of New York.

She is a co-creator of the only Motivational Conference all about dispatchers called 9114911 (.com)

Kelly is a motivational speaker who ignites audiences by relating to them with stories from her book as well as her life in the 911 industry.

Leading the way, Your way!

media bar inside box on 3 by 5 card 2 Leading doesn’t necessarily mean standing on a big podium speaking to thousands. It doesn’t mean you wind up on major news stations or being asked to be a keynote speaker somewhere. It is who you define yourself to be and what you do with it that garners that attention.

In public safety and elsewhere, the first rule of thumb on  whether or not you are a great leader is to take a look behind you and see if anyone is following.

In our Leadership Course I through V, we lay down a network of what being a leader truly looks like. Then we ask participants in several ways to define their style and characteristics. Here’s the cool part, we need all styles of leaders in this world, maybe different styles at different times etc.

For instance, when George W. was reading to those kids in that classroom when the twin towers were struck, it took him a few minutes to reflect on what was said and then decide what kind of leader to become. I know if that were me as my previous “leadership self”, I would have had to refrain from jumping up and screaming and running from the room. Today, I’ve learned and consequently teach what we call the “really” face. It is a neutral look that gives no hint of what you are thinking so you do not show alarm, worry, disdain, amusment, or anything until you are ready to take action.

Application of understanding and becoming enmeshed in the lesson allows our participants to fully realize how they can truly LEAD THEIR WAY!

The only secret here is you have to want to learn, and see your leadership style for what it is, and how to use it for good.

See you online or in live class soon at http://www.SuccessCommunicationsInc.com

Dr. Kelly R. Rasmussen, CEO

PROTECTIVE FACTORS AND RESILIENCE IN EMERGENCY DISPATCHERS

Slide1 In my dissertation results there were some very surprising and statistically significant findings. The one thing that resonated most with me is that emergency dispatchers fail to “do the right thing” for themselves because in this job where negativity breeds more negativity, you can lose sight of yourself. I used a quantitative correlational method to discover “How are problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies associated with resilience in emergency dispatchers” and “how are less adaptive coping strategies associated with resilience?”

Based on informed literature, the models explained 17% of the variance. This means that there is a positive association between higher coping and higher resilience when using identified variables, planning, active coping, and behavioral and mental disengagement.

For years, we have been empowering emergency dispatchers and their leaders through training and organizational development on methods how to help emergency communications centers gain balance and control over the atmosphere and morale of the workplace. This new data shines a light on avenues that leaders everywhere can begin to use immediately to enact a more positive workplace environment.

I am excited for the findings and plan to deliver a more comprehensive model for emergency communications centers everywhere!

Dr. Kelly R. Rasmussen

Negativity, Life, and Keurig cups

Look at life like your Keurig cup holder stand. If you invested in some “cool” flavor of the moment and filled the stand, and now you don’t like it so much, why do you leave that negative thing there filling your space? You look at it daily and say to yourself, “yuck” or “nah” or “not really feelin’ it” and still you move on and never discard the icky stuff. If you discard it, you have a hole, an empty space you have to fill. And sometimes we don’t know what to fill it with, so we never explore further. I’m telling you that it’s okay to have a spot ready and waiting for good to fill it, versus staring at that negative thing day in and day out. You’ll never know what good flavor is in store if you don’t empty out the bad.

Thinking of you and answering your call,

Dr. Kelly
DrKellyRasmussen@gmail.com

9-1-1, press 1 for emergency

It has become a “fill in the blank” world. We don’t want to let people think or even do for themselves anymore. Why? They might screw things up? Ponder the alternatives…

It is an automated world,
At the Dr’s office
Auto service place
Banks
Restaurants
Gas Stations
9-1-1

Think about it – systems were supposed to simplify things for us; as in technology was supposed to free up our time, right?

It simplifies things alright – For instance, the reason 9-1-1 call-takers or dispatchers get stuck on getting the location because it is drilled in their head (even National standards recommend first introduction, “9-1-1, what is the location of your emergency?”). THAT is a very good thing! We really want to know where to send and how many to send to your location. But the trouble comes in when the dispatcher gets STUCK there.

Odds are that you have heard a call where the dispatcher keeps asking, where is your location, where are you, what is the address, etc. They might even slip up with “I can’t send anyone until you tell me where you are” as that was my own learning curve many years ago. People in crisis do not want to, nor should they hear “I can’t help” you or “I can’t send anyone” as a prelude to ANYTHING else. We counter this in our training with “Tell them what you can do, not what you can’t do!” It is not trickery or magic, but merely word placement.

Another example is a “system” that tells you to ask the question no matter what info the person just offered up. I have been through this with medical systems, insurance systems, even tv satellite systems. It seems nobody is listening! But in 9-1-1 it goes like this, “my wife isn’t breathing” and still the dispatcher has to ask a question from the system after many other questions such as “is she having difficulty breathing?” And we feel like saying, “DUH.”

The dispatcher can get “dinged” or even reprimanded if they go outside of the system. I get it. I understand it covers them with liability.It’s hard to train these amazing professionals to do the right thing when they feel “damned if they do, or damned if they don’t.”

The point is, if we are afraid to listen, or cannot think for ourselves, or if someone has to follow a guidecard or template for directions on everything we do, then why do we need people?

Press 1 if you have an emergency.

OH – AND THANK YOU DISPATCHER WEBB FOR ANSWERING THE CALL AS A REAL LIFE HUMAN WITH EMPATHY AND COMPASSION!!!!

http://www.ems1.com/911/articles/2097855-911-dispatcher-breaks-protocol-to-save-baby-s-life/

I am still mad that Officer Scott Flahive had to die!

It’s been 20 years, and I am still mad that Officer Scott Flahive had to die. I am mad that we have bad people of all races, classes, and mental states who want to hurt or kill our officers.

I was a dispatcher that night and it affected my life forever. I have been in the public safety field from dispatcher to director of a 911 center. I see all sides. I still recoil when I hear of a senseless death of any officer. I tremble especially for the dispatchers who sit through the incident, in a room, helpless, and in the dark.

I remember Scott’s funeral vividly. I also remember his youthful face, his rookie voice, and his anxious passion for the job. Road patrol Lt. Beld did a fantastic job going nearly three days without sleep to pull off an incredibly honorable dedication to a young officer who died needlessly doing a job he loved.

What I still remember 20 years later is one officer after another crying and hugging each other. I remember all the colors of a sea of uniforms and patrol cars at the funeral. I remember working in dispatch to catch the second bad guy who was outstanding for a short time after the shooting. I remember the corrections officers who were injured not only on the breakout, but on the previous attempt when the bad guys practiced their getaway. All corrections officers, especially Cathy Shaw should be remembered as they did their very best to try to stop this horrible event from unfolding.

The night Scott died influenced my life. I remember the bond between dispatch, the road, corrections, and the community. I stand strong on that public safety tie that binds everyone together. I believe in it. I wish people should stop and see one another as people, not a color, not a uniform, not us vs. them. In the meantime, I am glad I had the honor to meet Scott, dispatch him, and protect him on so many nights.

To all who wear the uniforms and selflessly give, be safe. To all the dispatchers who hear the cries for help, (we hear you) and thank you for keeping them all safe.

~ Kelly R. Rasmussen, PhD

___________________________________________________________________________________

Kelly R. Rasmussen, PhD

Kelly has been with the 911 industry since 1986. She rose through the ranks from Dispatcher to Director to Dr. (PhD- Public Safety Leadership).

In 2006, Kelly co-founded Success Communications training company and has trained all over the U.S. and Canada. Success has been highlighted on CNN, MSNBC, Fox news, and other news channels.

She is the author of, CALL911! True Stories from My Life in Emergency Dispatch, published by Select Books of New York.

She is a co-creator of the only Motivational Conference all about dispatchers called 9114911 (.com)

Kelly is a motivational speaker who ignites audiences by relating to them with stories from her book as well as her life in the 911 industry.

Leadership for Emergency Dispatch and Public Safety

Leadership in an emergency communications center, and in public safety is more pivotal and crucial today than ever before. We need solid, educated, daring, and dedicated leaders to absorb all of the “new changes” on the horizon.  It is true that stellar leadership at the top is more critical than ever, and so it goes that those in the middle need direction, knowledge, and mentoring!

In our Leadership Series, we take you on a journey, and ask you to discover your true leadership style; in

Leadership I  – we ask you to think about whether or not you want to lead. It is a decision not to be taken lightly!
Leadership II – we ask you to Act like a leader and explore what & how that would look for you!
Leadership III – we ask you to Feel/Grow into what a leader might look like and how it feels to be that responsible!
Leadership IV – we ask you to OWN it and demonstrate to us how you have absorbed your leadership role!
Leadership V – we not only ask you but expect you to BE and become a great leader, in your own style!

And, as a result of so many succeeding and wanting much, much, more, we are announcing the Leadership Series Summit that will bring us all together to continue learning, and growing your skills! People want to be led! Are you ready?

Kelly R. Rasmussen, PhD
CEO – Success Communications, Inc.